Typhoid and swans: HANNIBAL Season 2 Episode 9: “Shiizakana” (Fuller, 2014)

Will is dreaming about killing Hannibal, tying him to a tree (the way Hannibal kills Dortlich, one of the men who ate his sister, in the book Hannibal). Instead of a horse, the show uses a stag, and instead of Dortlich, we see Hannibal, and then Stagman.

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Hannibal (in Will’s dream, remember) refuses to denounce himself as a monster

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He wants to talk about how we know another person:

“No one can be fully aware of another human being unless we love them. By that love, we see potential in our beloved. Through that love, we allow our beloved to see their potential. Expressing that love, our beloved’s potential comes true.”

He’s not talking Alana here. The love theme between Will and Hannibal that dominates the third season has started, within Will’s subconscious. The stag pulls the rope tied around Hannibal’s neck until

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Hannibal, meanwhile, is making dinner for Jack: Sacromonte omelette with liver and sweetbreads. He explains that he spent some happy days in Granada as a young man (I wonder if his Cervantes is as good as his Dante?)

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He doesn’t explain where his liver and sweetbreads are usually sourced from. Jack should know – Will told him all about it in episode 6: “You and I probably sipped wine while swallowing the people to whom we were trying to give justice”. But Jack’s a professional, and if he is worried about the provenance of the sweetbreads, he manages to give every indication of thoroughly enjoying his meal.

This episode’s killer is a beast that tears people to pieces, but doesn’t eat any of them, which makes him fairly irrelevant from the POV of a cannibal blog. Of course, it turns out to be a human in animal costume with mechanical cave-bear jaws, and of course he turns out to be a former patient of Hannibal’s. Is there any crazy SOB that this man hasn’t treated?

Then again, Hannibal’s treatment is far from orthodox. He is pleased to see Will express regret at letting Hannibal stop him from killing the dude in the stable last episode. He tells Will that

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But Hannibal considers that his choices are usually made for a good reason, so there is no real point to regret. He wants Will to adapt. Will mutters:

“Adapt. Evolve. Become.”

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We go into extreme close up. “Adapt, evolve, become” is the mantra of the Übermensch. Hannibal believes Will can adapt, evolve, become like him – a superior being to whom killing of ordinary people is no more regrettable than killing a fly. Killing Hobbes, and thinking he had killed Hannibal, gave Will a quiet sense

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And as Chilton told us, also in episode 6

“He is attracted to medical and psychological fields because they offer power over man. Cannibalism is an act of dominance”.

The power to kill. The power to eat. The power of what Derrida called “carnivorous virility” that defines humanity and its subjugation of nature.

We finally meet Margot Verger, in Hannibal’s office, complaining about the inhumanity of her brother. If carnivorous virility defines our humanity, and he is master of a cattle and hog killing enterprise, how can she dehumanise him like that?

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The FBI now think that the cave-bear is actually a dude who has trained a bear or wolf to attack first “livestock” (hate that word) and now humans. “Bigger prey” says Will. Hannibal, dressed in the only hat worth wearing in Baltimore, suggests:

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The dude is Randall Tier (Mark O’Brien) and he is preparing his mechanical jaws for the next date; we then see him tearing a couple of young lovers to pieces. Will does his pendulum thing and re-enacts the scene in his mind, but this time he is not just the killer – he is killer as stagman. He is evolving into Hannibal.

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Will says that the killing is not by an animal, and is not personal. The killer just wants to maul. To hunt.

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The people Hannibal kills for their livers and sweetbreads – they’re not personal either, although some admittedly are rude.

This episode sheds a lot of light on Hannibal’s philosophy of becoming and his search to find or develop (another) Nietzschean Übermensch. In Red Dragon, Francis Dolarhyde is becoming the Dragon (and will do so again in Season 3 of this series). In Silence of the Lambs, Jame Gumb is becoming a woman, or so he hopes, by skinning women and making a suit.

Hannibal tells Will:

“The way any animal thinks depends on limitations of mind and body. If we learn our limitations too soon, We never learn our power.”

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He tells Jack “Animals are far more like humans than we ever realised. And humans are far more like animals”.

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And he tells Randall (straight out of his words to Dolarhyde in Red Dragon):

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Hannibal, as exponent of becoming, believes he is Nietzsche’s Übermensch and wants to recruit others to this higher self. This really is the ultimate in anthropocentrism – putting humans on a different plane to other animals. But Hannibal is not a speciesist, because he does not consider most humans to be truly human. They are just means toward achieving the goal – becoming the higher self. He tells Randall:

“You bore screams like a sculptor bears dust from the beaten stone.”

This is the heart of Hannibal’s cannibalism: the slow-witted masses are simply raw materials to be used by the artist, who is becoming something greater, a higher self. Randall killing people, Will killing people, Margot killing people: these are all steps to their becoming.

Will asks Hannibal in his therapy session what he thinks about when he thinks about killing. The answer is crucial to understanding Hannibal and his philosophy (it is taken from Hannibal’s conversation with Clarice in Silence of the Lambs).

Hannibal: I think about God

Will: Good and evil?

Hannibal: Good and evil has nothing to do with God. I collect church collapses. Did you see the recent one in Sicily? The façade fell on 65 grandmothers during a special mass. Was that evil? Was that God? If he’s up there, he just loves it.

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We are all Nietzschean fish: HANNIBAL Season 2 Episode 8 “Su-zakana” (Fuller, 2014)

When Jacques Derrida pointed out that the binary of inside/outside is “the matrix of all possible opposition”, he was apparently not referring to this episode of Hannibal, not even to cannibalism particularly. But he was big on deconstructing binary oppositions, and his opinion that the core binary, the binary to end (or start) all binaries, is that between inside and outside, is particularly apposite to this episode.

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Will and Jack are fishing through a hole in the frozen ice of a river, but the prey they are planning to capture is not piscine – it’s Hannibal. Yes, Jack finally got the message; they are no longer discussing whether Hannibal is the Ripper, now it’s about the tactics that might entrap him. They are outside of Hannibal’s world of gourmet human flesh, and their way through it is via his table. Live bait, to lure a predator.

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IMHO this is one of the key episodes of the series, smack in its middle (although who knew that the blinkered, Philistine network would cancel after three seasons?), and it features the line that for me is the core of the whole Hannibal mythology:

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One of Nietzsche’s most quoted aphorisms is “That which does not kill me makes me stronger” and that, for Hannibal, is precisely the role of a true friend. One should be, to a friend, “an arrow and a longing for the Übermensch” (the superman). This is to what Hannibal was referring when he said that the struggles with Will (including, of course, his attempted murder of Hannibal) would change them – that they were “all Nietzschean fish”.

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Will has brought along a wild-caught trout, from his icy rendezvous with Jack. Hannibal has prepared it as truite saumonee au bleu, and the trout seems to be regurgitating his own tail.

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You thought “turducken” was some brilliant 21st century idea? Nup. The Tudors were doing it in the 16th century, and it was called “engastration” meaning “stuffed up the gastric passages”. Their specialities included pie from a whole turkey stuffed with a goose, who was stuffed with a chicken, then a partridge, which was stuffed with a pigeon. This poor trout has his own tail in his mouth, but he is the very totem of cannibalism: humans eating humans; we eat ourselves.

They dine to the Piano Concerto 1 in C Major by Ludwig Van Beethoven, or at least that is what we, the audience get to consume, while they enjoy the fish and the banter. Will is being a smartarse, implying that he still suspects, or knows, that Hannibal is the cannibal, and implying he might be joining up with him.

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Jack is quick to dispel the idea that they might have doubts about Hannibal, but alludes instead to:

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Hannibal is ready for that. He has a whole Nietzschean weltanschauung to share with his admiring friends:

“We need to move past apologies and forgiveness. We will absorb this experience.”

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This could have almost come out of Thus spake Zarathustra, in which “man is overcome and the concept Übermensch becomes the greatest reality”. Hannibal, as we know, spends his time helping the region’s many serial killers and tormented psychotics to “become” their greater selves. As a leading forensic psychiatrist, he is familiar with, and often therapist to, most of those who will be pursued by the FBI. Like Nietzsche, who said that “Zarathustra, as the first psychologist of the good man, is perforce the friend of the evil man”, Hannibal is drawn to these violent individuals, not to cure them but to see if they can become a higher form – an Übermensch.

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Now we get into the episode’s killing time and, again, there is engastration involved. This time, a vet examining a dead horse finds she was not pregnant, but has a dead woman sewn inside her. Now, that’s worth calling the FBI for.

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Hannibal is still acting as murderer-interpreter, despite having said he was retiring last episode. He sees that the woman is inside the horse for a reason:

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Yeah, where have we heard that before? Ah yes, Jame Gumb (Buffalo Bill) in Silence of the Lambs, who put a moth chrysalis into the throat of each victim, as they ‘gave’ their skin to assist his becoming a woman.  But what was this woman supposed to become? She’s pretty dead.

Look, this whole woman in horse plot is a bit silly, so we get to meet another really important character family: the Vergers. We don’t see Mason yet, who will be the main antagonist later, but we hear him as he rapes his sister, Margo, saying

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Since we’ve all read the book or seen the film Hannibal, we know that Mason used to give poor kids chocolate at his father’s poor-kids’-camps, just before he abused them. So, Margo has changed (in the book she is a weight-lifting lesbian, who would be less prone to submit to Mason’s perverse desires, but the bodybuilding lesbian is such a stereotype). Now she is very cute, and we figure someone is going to fall for her, and that someone’s gonna be Will, because we suddenly see a filmy love scene, apparently inspired by the impressionistic sex scene in the film Fight Club, which turns out to be Alana and Hannibal. Is Hannibal bi, or just using her? Best not to talk about it.

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Hannibal has his own hopes for Margo Verger, including a course of Übermensch 101, which is – get them to kill someone. In this case, her abusive and filthy rich brother.

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Alana really likes to talk about stuff in bed, much to Hannibal’s obvious distaste.

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The woman in the horse’s uterus is on the slab, very dead, giving the BAU (Behavioral Analysis Unit) guys a chance to get some cannibal talk in.

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But hey, there’s a heartbeat! Is this the birth that Hannibal predicted? They open her up, crack apart the ribs, and a bird flies out. Birth, resurrection, growth, all basic issues in Hannibal and the rest of Western literature.

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And we’re not finished with inside/outside dualisms and engastration. The bird in the woman in the horse was meant to be her rebirth, and Hannibal points out to Will:

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Will has found out that “doing bad things to bad people makes you feel good”, a truth that Hannibal emphasises to him, and also to Margo, who has been dehumanised by her brother, and since then by her family, who consider her weird. She’s come to the right analyst here:

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But does Will still want to kill Hannibal?

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Oh, yes, the sub-plot. The psychopath killing people is the social worker of the guy who sewed the woman into the horse, hoping for a rebirth. Those two, of course, must have their confrontation. It results in one of the great lines of the show:

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He’s certainly in there, but he’s not dead, and tears his way out of the horse’s uterus just as Hannibal is bonding with a sheep, a nod to the original theme of Silence of the Lambs.

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Will wants to kill the dude, but Hannibal stops him. Killing people is 101, and Will is way past that, so Hannibal sticks his thumb in the gun’s hammer just as Will is about to blow the killer away. Killing this random psychopath will not move Will onto a higher level of evolution.

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But Hannibal is impressed as hell at Will’s progress from wimpy FBI trainer to willing executioner. With dialogue quoted straight out of Hannibal’s thoughts about Clarice at the end of the book Hannibal, he tells Will:

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“I can feed the caterpillar, and I can whisper through the chrysalis, but what hatches”:

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As the great Derridean and Nietzschean philosopher Dr Seuss once said: “Inside, Outside, Upside Down”.

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Hannibal in your head – HANNIBAL Season 2 Episode 7 (Fuller, 2014)

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Psychic cannibalism. It’s a big theme in Silence of the Lambs. Clarice Starling is told by Jack Crawford “You don’t want Hannibal Lecter inside your head”, but that’s what happens – she swaps her psychic traumas for his insights into the serial killer she is seeking (whom he happens to know). He “eats” her anguish, sips at her pain.

Just so, Miriam Lass (Anna Chlumsky from Veep and My Girl and lots of other things) tells Jack Crawford, after she has been missing for two years, that she doesn’t remember the Ripper, or how she found him, because

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Her name has been changed in the TV show to protect the copyright holders, but she is certainly Clarice, drugged by Hannibal as per the book and film Hannibal, but merged with the book/film Red Dragon version of Will Graham, who indeed discovered that Hannibal was the Ripper, and got himself severely ripped for his troubles. As usual, some brilliant reimagining of the Hannibal myth by Bryan Fuller.

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Miriam has had an arm removed, but just to torment Jack, not for gustatory purposes. She heard the Ripper’s voice, but cannot identify his face. Will she identify Hannibal?

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Will is free – all charges have been dropped, since the Ripper is still killing. He tells Chilton that Abel Gideon is dead (Hannibal ate him) and that he, Chilton is next. But why, Chilton asks, did Hannibal not just kill Will?

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It’s his design, of course. Will comes for Hannibal with a gun, ready to finish job that Jack Crawford interrupted in the Season 1 finale. But Hannibal is still inside his head

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No, we don’t want to know how it ends – we want it to go on and on. #BRINGBACKHANNIBAL! But we need to know who is going to be the Chesapeake Ripper now that Will has been cleared of the crime. Well, who else might he frame but Frederick Chilton? Hannibal has put the remaining parts of Abel Gideon in Frederick’s house, on life support, which fails just as Chilton enters. Bits of Gideon lie around

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The FBI arrive to pick up Chilton, but Hannibal drugs him, tells him as he goes under that, when he wakes, he will have to run. Indeed he will, because Hannibal lets in the FBI red-shirts, kills them, and leaves one disembowelled and the other run through a hundred times like the classical ‘wounded man’ drawing, which of course is readily available on Chilton’s bookshelves, as well as having been planted as a memory in Miriam Lass’ mind.

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He runs, leaving the FBI to find their dead agents (which always puts them in a bad mood) and the remains of Abel Gideon.

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He runs to Will’s house, much to the delight of the dogs (he is covered in blood), has a shower and prepares to flee the country.

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Will advises him to stay and wait:

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But Gideon runs, pursued by a vengeful Jack Crawford, finally giving up, in the now familiar crucifixion pose, just as Jack is about to shoot him.

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Hannibal is alone in his consulting room. It’s the time he had allotted for Will’s weekly session, and here comes Will, not with a gun this time.

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Now begins the dangerous game. Hannibal has been way too smart for the FBI, but Will figures he knows him, knows his strategies, can outplay him. Hannibal’s design is to turn Will into himself, into an Übermensch, but Will thinks he can catch Hannibal, pretend to be ‘becoming’, and fool him into confessing.

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It’s cannibal chess.

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“An act of dominance: HANNIBAL Season 2 Episode 6 “Futamono” (Fuller, 2014)

Why do cannibals eat people? This episode looks at that question, and demonstrates that they do it for the same reason that anyone eats anything. Appetite and power. Hunger and dominance. They want to, and they can. Isn’t that why people eat other animals?

Hannibal had a near death experience in the previous episode and, as this one starts, he is playing harpsichord. As he explains to Alana Bloom, who is also a psychiatrist and into this stuff:

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He is growing. Becoming, as he hopes Will is growing and becoming – becoming a killer and cannibal like him.

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Well, Will is already a cannibal – as he says to Jack Crawford:

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Look, people as a rule don’t like cannibals much. Will tells Jack that he (Will) has “contempt for the Ripper, contempt for what he does”. What does he do? Jack asks.  In a piece of dialogue straight out of the interview between Clarice and Hannibal in Silence of the Lambs, Will tells us:

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If Will was Hannibal, he’d quote Marcus Aurelius. But this is close enough. Jack points out that the killer harvests organs. That’s what he does, sure, but why? Why does he need to do it?

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Will is quick to point out that Hannibal is not like Hobbs, who honoured the animals (human and other) that he killed and ate. He uses the word “sounder” (a collective noun for hogs) deliberately.

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Well, Hannibal is certainly thinking gastronomically. He is cutting up and skewering the pieces of a heart – human, probably. Alana is helping him, analysing him, working on a definition of humanity as they prepare the heart:

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…and the things that make us human. Good and bad, love and ache.

Hannibal has not recovered from the murder attempt on himself.

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And when Hannibal goes shopping, it’s not random. He has a method. A list of rude people, and a wonderful, hand-written recipe card base.

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The latest victim has been grafted onto a tree in a carpark, his organs replaced with poisonous flowers. All except for his lungs.

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Jack realises why: This is a judgement.

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Jack wants to tell Hannibal about the latest case, but he won’t listen.

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How is he going to do that?

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Well, Will told Jack that if people were being killed, then Hannibal was planning a dinner party. Is this all still too subtle for Jack?

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But now, Will is not alone. Abel Gideon knows about Hannibal, and so does Chilton, who records all their conversations. Jack asks Chilton if he knows what he is accusing Hannibal of? Oh yes.

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Chilton is a believer, now that his life is at stake. He analyses Hannibal as psychopath:

Jack, he fits the profile. He is attracted to medical and psychological fields because they offer power over man. Cannibalism –

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Hannibal eats people because he wants to, and because he can. He shows his dominance, and he dispenses justice. The dude grafted into a tree had, Jack observes, “paved paradise and put up a parking lot.” It had been an important nesting habitat for endangered songbirds.

Hannibal is picking victims for his dinner party. The recipes and victims are chosen and prepared carefully, to a Strauss “love song waltz”.

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Hannibal’s party is splendid, with liveried footmen serving the dishes he planned during the sequences above. Chilton and Jack watch the well-heeled, well-fed guests tuck in to the fare.

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Jack rudely takes a plate of delicacies home with him. Or back to the lab.

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But Hannibal is one step ahead – the food was made of animals other than humans – goose, pig, cow.

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But Hannibal has new dinner plans. He drugs Alana, who becomes his alibi as he goes to the asylum and kidnaps Abel Gideon, the man who attempted to steal his identity by claiming to be the Chesapeake Ripper.

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Gideon, now crippled by the asylum guards, will be both guest of honour and main course: Hannibal has amputated his “useless” leg and prepared it as Roti de cuisse: clay-roasted thigh with canoe-cut marrowbone.

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Gideon is a little unsure of the etiquette of the guest / meat.

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Then, there are more tributes to the earlier books/movies:

Silence of the Lambs

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And Hannibal Rising

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And Silence again – the girl in the pit.

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Hannibal has finished his composition. This was his design.

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“He is the devil. He is smoke.” HANNIBAL Season 2 Episode 05 “Mukōzuke” (Fuller, 2014)

At its core, cannibalism is about food, eating, the joy of taste. This episode therefore commences with a comparison of the meals of Hannibal, free, prosperous, creative

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and Will, confined, subject to whatever gruel is dished up in the asylum.

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As Hannibal tells Jack:

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Hannibal eats food, not friends. He is cooking for Jack, again, making Jack perhaps the pre-eminent innocent cannibal of the series, since he dines there so often. But this time, he is pre-occupied, upset that his wife tried to kill herself, grateful that Hannibal stopped her. Hannibal discusses his own dilemma: as a doctor, he had no choice, but

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Hannibal is a good friend, says Jack. That, as we know, won’t last.

Beverly Katz has been neatly dissected and mounted into giant slides. As Will figures, she has been pulled apart layer by layer, as she would dissect a crime scene.

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Will asks to see her, and is given the same treatment Hannibal received in the film of Silence of the Lambs: straight-jacket, hockey mask and transported on a furniture trolley.

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He does his pendulum, re-enactment, this is my design, thing. He knows who killed Beverly, but cannot tell Jack, because Jack doesn’t want to believe it. Will does say that she will be missing organs:

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She is indeed missing kidneys. And guess what Hannibal’s having for lunch?

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Yep. Nice steak and kidney pie. Seems to be enjoying it too.

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So, as Clarice once asked, why does Hannibal do what he does? Abel Gideon has his own theory, not so different to the way Madds said in an interview that he chose to play him:

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He warns Will that he will never catch the Ripper – he will have to kill him. Another insight into where the series might be heading.

Hannibal now has a couple of people who suspect him: Will, of course, but also Abel Gideon, who Will brought to his house the night Gideon removed most of Chilton’s guts. He asks Chilton why, in those circumstances, he would bring Gideon back to “your hospital for the unworried unwell” [great Hannibal quip BTW]. Chilton claims it was not for “selfish reasons”. “Ah, selfishness” comments Hannibal

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He goes to meet Gideon, who is still interested in his satanic analysis:

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Outside the asylum, he is photographed by Freddie Lounds. You have to give her credit for bravery – Hannibal says something that would bring a chill to those who know him like we do, know his penchant for eating rude people:

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She goes in to interview Will, and is given the same instructions Clarice received in Silence of the Lambs:

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Will is using Freddie to contact his “admirer” – the one who killed the bailiff in his trial, hoping to get him exonerated.  Turns out to be the nurse in the “hospital for the unworried unwell”. Why? Well, smaller birds will mob a hawk.

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Yes, another elitist. Perhaps even a Nietzschean. He wants the hawks to work together. Happy to help Will any way he can. What favour can he do for Will? Will wants to make sure what happened to Beverly cannot happen again.

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Will dreams he is becoming the beast – antlers growing from his back. Hannibal is doing laps of the pool, which explains why he is in great shape and able to kill people who often seem somehow younger and fitter. Also, cold water is great for shifting blood stains. The nurse is the only other swimmer (obviously a very exclusive pool) and shoots Hannibal with a tranquiliser dart. He sinks, but that’s not a suitable death, so next we see him teetering on a bucket, bleeding out, and in a semi-crucifixion position.

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The nurse knows that Hannibal is the Ripper, and asks him

How many times have you watched someone cling on to a life that’s not really worth living? Eking out a few extra seconds. Wondering why they bother.

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The nurse, like Hannibal, is into becoming.

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Maybe your murders will become my murders. I’ll be the Chesapeake Ripper now!

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Jack arrives in the nick of time. But Hannibal has faced death, and therefore has grown. Now it’s Will’s turn.

 

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“Death is not a defeat” HANNIBAL Season 2 Episode 4 “Takiawase” (Fuller 2014)

Previously on Hannibal, Will Graham was arrested for Hannibal’s murders, and chose to plead not guilty; but if the verdict goes against him, the penalty will be death. However, he now has a short reprieve thanks to a secret admirer, who generously killed the judge in his case. We, the audience, have a chance to “draw a breath”, which is also the term for being alive. And this episode is all about life and death, and choosing between them, for ourselves, for those we love, and for our victims. It is summed up in the “previously on Hannibal” reprise, where Jack and Hannibal discuss death. Jack has spent his life chasing serial killers:

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Will mentally escapes his prison purgatory by remembering good times – fishing. He finds this, as many people describe, relaxing and even meditative. In this memory, he visualises teaching Abigail to fish, the same Abigail who everyone believes is dead and at least partly inside Will’s digestive tract (in that he vomited up one of her ears). Abigail sees no real difference between hunting with her father, who killed and ate girls who looked like her, and trapping and killing fish. She has a point.

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Beverley, the super smart FBI investigator, wants to believe Will is not guilty, but cannot buy his accusations against Hannibal. She seeks Will’s assistance to understand who killed the dude who made mosaics out of corpses, and gets mad at him when he accuses, who else, Hannibal. Why, she asks, would he do it?

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He tells her: “There will be a clever detail – he wouldn’t be able to resist it.”

Will is contemplating murder, Beverley is contemplating motive, and Jack’s wife, Bella, is contemplating suicide. Her breast cancer has spread, and she is consulting Hannibal about life and death, subjects on which, like most things, he is expert. Her cancer has won the battle, and she has no quality of life, is only staying alive for Jack.

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That thought, she tells Hannibal, makes her feel alive. How, she asks, does it make Hannibal feel? And that question affords us a fascinating glimpse into Hannibal as Übermensch:

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“The thought that my life could end at any moment frees me to fully appreciate the beauty and art and horror of everything this world has to offer”

Nietzsche, like Hannibal, was a Dionysian, contemptuous of the moralising of Christian ethics. Dionysus was the god of controlled passion, a worthy adversary to Christian suppression of passion. Nietzsche pictured himself as a satyr, half man, half goat, a bridge between man and nature, an affirmer of life.  Will Graham sees Hannibal, after he realises that he is the killer they seek, as a faceless man with stag-horns, a windigo, a monster from Algonquian legend, transformed from human shape into a powerful creature driven by a lust for human flesh. Hannibal is Dionysus, in his form as satyr.

Hannibal is clearly a master of ancient Greek culture, telling Bella, as they discuss suicide (according to Sartre, the only subject worth discussing):

“Upon taking his own life, Socrates offered a rooster to the god of healing, to pay his debt. To Socrates, death was not a defeat…”

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There is of course a separate killer keeping the FBI team busy – a sweet, new agey woman who wants to put people out of their misery, taking away their pain with her herbal cures, in one case blinding a patient, in the other killing him and filling his head with bees. She is also, the team speculates, into mythological symbolism:

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Beverley discovers, after some broad hints from Hannibal, that the killer from last episode, the dude making mosaics out of corpses, is missing a kidney. This links the murder of the murderer to the Chesapeake ripper, who takes surgical trophies from his victims.

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Will remembers Hannibal’s first visit to his home in Season 1 Episode 1, with breakfast neatly packed in a picnic basket.

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Will realises that Hannibal was feeding him human flesh, and so he also is a cannibal, if innocently. And we know Jack has been dining regularly at Hannibal’s table.

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Bella has taken Hannibal’s musings about suicide to heart, and decided that the life Jack wants to preserve (hers) is of a quality not worth saving.

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She has taken a lethal dose of her morphine. Hannibal has reservations – not about death, which, we remember, he described as a cure. But about the effect on his friend, her husband, Jack.

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Life, death. They are no more than the flip of a coin.

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He revives her. She wakes up and gives him a pretty good slap, for someone who was nearly dead. Her view: he has robbed her of her release, her “cure”.

Meanwhile, Beverley is convinced of Will’s claims against Hannibal and goes snooping in his basement. This was never going to end well.

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Merely the ink from which flows my poem: HANNIBAL Season 2 Episode 3 “Hassun” (Fuller, 2014)

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Will is awaiting trial, and the FBI has offered a plea deal – but if he fights the case and loses, he’ll face the death penalty. The electric chair. We see him in that chair, smoke rising from his corpse, as the clock ticks – backwards. Like Vertov’s bull in Kino-Eye, he comes back to life. Then we see the executioner – it is Will himself, looking serious, and quite spiffy, in a suit.

He’s clearly anxious about the trial.

He buttons himself into a suit; so does Hannibal. They dress to the dalla sua pace aria from Don Giovanni. It is a song of anxiety – Donna Anna has asked her fiancé, Don Ottavio, to kill Don Giovanni in revenge. But all Ottavio can do is worry about her state of mind. Hannibal is feeling a bit guilty too perhaps, or is this his design? Anyway, he is creating a protégé from young Will, and doesn’t want electric chairs getting in his way.

Hannibal puts on cuff-links, while Will has hand-cuffs. Easy to confuse the two words.

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The Prosecution argues that Will killed and ate Abigail as her father had planned to do. Her father killed girls and ate them, so then did Will. The crime, although it’s a murder trial, is clearly cannibalism.

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Jack is called as a witness and dumps on the FBI case, taking the blame for pushing Will too hard, and pleading the Hannah Arendt defence: Will had objected to the name “museum of evil minds” because

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Will’s Defence lawyer opens an envelope and another ear falls out.

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Hannibal’s diagnosis: there may be another killer. He has sent this ear to help you prove you are not guilty. He is an admirer. Will is incredulous – an admirer?

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Hannibal speculates that the killer wants to be seen. Why?

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In court, it’s not getting better though. Freddie tells how Abigail believed that, like her father

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Chilton gives damning evidence, and uses Clarice’s line about Hannibal from Silence of the Lambs:

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Hannibal takes Will a folder of crime scene photos from the latest murder – the court bailiff who was killed: found burned, mounted on stag’s head, Glasgow smile and ear lopped off. The team are calling it “Will Graham’s greatest hits”. Will does his pendulum thing (obviously feeling much better) and sees himself kill the dude, but without it being, you know, personal:

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But Will sees that this is a different killer:

“Cassie’s lungs were removed while she was still breathing. Georgia was burned alive. What I found of Abigail was cut off while her heart was beating.”

Hannibal admits he knew that, but wants Will to use this as a defence, even though it’s a lie.

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Hannibal gets on the stand, and takes the oath, but Will sees through him.

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Hannibal lies for Will, saying it’s the same killer. It’s love, or as the prosecutor says, “his personal beliefs and biases are driving his conclusions.”

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The judge tosses out the defence. Hannibal is pissed. Not in control.

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Bad idea, judge. He is found holding the scales of justice. His brain on one side of the scales, his heart on the other.

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But there will be a mistrial. Will has a reprieve. For now.

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